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Multidisciplinary Engineering Capstone Design

Capstone Design

The EEIC Multidisciplinary Engineering Capstone Program opens a broad range of opportunities for engineering and non-engineering students. Authentic, industry-sponsored projects provide students the opportunity to apply their education and develop professional skills in real-world problem solving.

Capstone Program Growth

Since its creation in 2009, the Multidisciplinary Engineering Capstone Design offers an innovative option every year. It has grown and expanded to incorporate students from many engineering departments, as well as business, industrial design, MBA, and humanities. The program recently partnered with the engineering sciences minor, resulting in an even broader diversity of participating students.

Capstone Project Sub-Programs

Multidisciplinary Engineering Capstone Design consists of three types of projects each incorporating different students and industry partners.

Industry-Sponsored Projects:

Students participating in industry-sponsored projects experience close relationships with companies through their liaisons and visits to their facilities. There are two broad categories of industry-sponsored Capstone projects which are run by the EEIC as ENGR 4901, 4902, and 4903:

I. Process and Equipment Design:

These projects generally employ engineering students of different disciplines. Projects provide students experience working with teams on realistic problems including process design, quality improvement, equipment design, cost reduction, ergonomics, safety and environmental.

II. Product Design:

Teams on product design projects develop or improve specific products or processes for the sponsor company with a focus on improving a company’s competitive position. The program is geared towards mutually beneficial cooperation between local Ohio companies and OSU students to reduce costs, improve performance, introduce new products, and introduce new markets.  This combination of technical, design, and commercial needs provides students with first-hand relevant industry experience.

Social lnnovation and Commercialization (SIAC):

This program is a collaboration between non-profit organizations and several colleges including College of Arts and Sciences, Engineering, Business, & Applied Medicine. lt is currently sponsored by the College of Engineering and the Tony R. Wells Foundation with a goal to become self-sustaining through commercialization of products designed for people with disabilities.

Humanitarian Engineering Capstone:

Humanitarian engineering projects involve the development of affordable and sustainable solutions to problems related to basic needs of underserved peoples in the world.  In conjunction with our partner in Choluteca, Honduras, teams design and test a prototype at OSU and then implement a complete solution in-country during a 2-week trip in May, with the eventual aim of supporting the launch of a Honduran-owned small business to allow for replication.  These projects generally conform to a 3-phase model that involves proving feasibility of an innovation or technology in-country in an educational environment (Phase 1), community introduction and feedback (Phase 2) and design modification and business launch (Phase 3).  Humanitarian Engineering projects are supported by corporate foundations and other philanthropic sources and include funds for international travel.

Course Methodology

Exposing students to real world engineering design problems is the goal of this program. And, students find this type of project challenging and fulfilling because they contribute to a real problem with a real company. Students’ learning is further enhanced through client design reviews, sharing of historical information, and contribution of domain-specific knowledge. 

Development of professional skills:

Developing professional skills to improve students' awareness of the engineering practice enhances the overall competence of students and provides lifelong learning skills including proficiency in:

  • Communication
  • Engineering Ethics
  • Teamwork
  • Professional Presentations
  • Professional Etiquette
  • Project Management

One of the primary learning objectives is to practice a formal design process. This approach incorporates the following elements into the program of study:

1.       Problem Definition
2.       Specifications
3.       Concept Design
4.       Detail Design
5.       Prototype Build
6.       Prototype Validation
7.       Final Documentation and Recommendations

Contact Information

For more information about any of EEIC's capstone programs go to the Capstone Contact tab.